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Donor Identity: 4 Reasons Why People Give

Donor Identity: 4 Reasons Why People Give

While every person is different, you’ll find that many people share similar motivation for giving to a nonprofit organization. Of course, this motivation varies from organization to organization, and it’s in your nonprofit’s best interest to do its homework and learn more about its donors. This will help you craft the most effective appeals.

But we’re going to address some of the most common reasons, or “pull” factors, for why people choose to give. We hope that this “cheat sheet”, of sorts, serves as a springboard for your own research!

1. Emotion | As you’d expect, emotion plays perhaps the largest role in people’s motivation to give. Whether it’s a story that tugs on their heartstrings or a family member who is actively fighting a disease, emotion often compels us to take action.

2. Religion | Much of nonprofit giving, particularly if it’s to a religious charity or organization, stems from a commandment to give and help others in need. Even if there is very little emotional investment in the nonprofit, many people will still donate to organizations because their religion instructs them to love others and give to the poor.

3. Community | Nonprofits bring people together. Why? It’s because nonprofits aren’t self-serving. They exist to benefit and bring aid to others. This creates a sense community among donors, and people often donate to become part of that community.

4. Legacy | You’ll often hear of people giving to a nonprofit because it “runs in the family”. Yes, many people donate because their forefathers made donations, and they want to carry on that tradition. This adds to the family legacy and strengthens the ties between family name and nonprofit.

Grassroot Communication Donor Identiy

If you’re not sure where to start when crafting your next appeal, keep these four “pull” factors in mind! If you’re able to touch on each of these elements without disrupting flow or making your letter sound contrived, you’ll certainly be able to resonate with a larger audience. But remember – there is no substitute for nonprofit-specific research.

The more you’re able to learn about your own donors and prospects, the better you’ll be able to position your organization during your next set of appeals.