9203 Mike Garcia Dr, Manassas, VA 20109 540 428 7000 info@grassrootcomunication.com
subscribe

Donor Identity: 4 Reasons Why People Give

Donor Identity: 4 Reasons Why People Give

While every person is different, you’ll find that many people share similar motivation for giving to a nonprofit organization. Of course, this motivation varies from organization to organization, and it’s in your nonprofit’s best interest to do its homework and learn more about its donors. This will help you craft the most effective appeals.

But we’re going to address some of the most common reasons, or “pull” factors, for why people choose to give. We hope that this “cheat sheet”, of sorts, serves as a springboard for your own research!

1. Emotion | As you’d expect, emotion plays perhaps the largest role in people’s motivation to give. Whether it’s a story that tugs on their heartstrings or a family member who is actively fighting a disease, emotion often compels us to take action.

2. Religion | Much of nonprofit giving, particularly if it’s to a religious charity or organization, stems from a commandment to give and help others in need. Even if there is very little emotional investment in the nonprofit, many people will still donate to organizations because their religion instructs them to love others and give to the poor.

3. Community | Nonprofits bring people together. Why? It’s because nonprofits aren’t self-serving. They exist to benefit and bring aid to others. This creates a sense community among donors, and people often donate to become part of that community.

4. Legacy | You’ll often hear of people giving to a nonprofit because it “runs in the family”. Yes, many people donate because their forefathers made donations, and they want to carry on that tradition. This adds to the family legacy and strengthens the ties between family name and nonprofit.

Grassroot Communication Donor Identiy

If you’re not sure where to start when crafting your next appeal, keep these four “pull” factors in mind! If you’re able to touch on each of these elements without disrupting flow or making your letter sound contrived, you’ll certainly be able to resonate with a larger audience. But remember – there is no substitute for nonprofit-specific research.

The more you’re able to learn about your own donors and prospects, the better you’ll be able to position your organization during your next set of appeals.

Putting Donor Identity into Practice

In our last issue of Donor Centric, we gave an introduction to the concept of donor identity and the role that it plays in not only donors’ decisions to give in the first place, but also in their motivation for giving.

If your organization is to maximize its ability to attract, reach, and resonate with donors, you’re going to need to narrow your focus and make donor identity a point of emphasis.
But how do you achieve that?

Here are two things your organization can start doing today, to ensure that you are putting your best foot forward.

1. Collect Data
The most obvious first step is learning about your donors! You can achieve this in a few different ways. First, check out your social media demographics. If you have a decent following on any social media platforms, use your platform’s analytics tool to start viewing what data is available on your followers. You might find that your followers, and the people who gravitate toward your organization, are much different than you had initially thought!

Next, issue a survey to your email list. If you don’t already have an email list – whether it’s through a newsletter subscription or otherwise – now is as good a time as ever to start putting this together. Send a survey out to those on your list, asking people to provide a little information about themselves. This might be in the form of a short questionnaire, a poll, or another method. You don’t need to pry into someone’s personal life for this to be effective. Learning about someone’s occupation, the country or state where they reside, and a few of their interests and passions can provide your organization with a wealth of insight.

Finally, just ask. Send an email to current donors only, and ask specifically why they decided to give to your organization. This will help you identify your organization’s greatest pull factors so that you can prioritize them when it comes time to make your next appeal to new prospects or lapsed donors.

 

Grassroot Communication | Donor Identiy

2. Diversify Your Appeal Strategy
Now that know a little more about your different donors, it’s time to start putting this information to use. But remember – the degree to which you will be able to execute this is dependent on your organization’s resources, as well as your willingness to do so. The vague blanket emails you might send to thousands of people at a time? It’s time to throw them out. It’s time to start diversifying, and you can achieve this in two different ways.

The first option is to use the data you have collected to segment your target audience into different streams. One group might consist of activists who are passionate and vocal about human rights or equality, for example. A second group might consist of people who have recently donated to a nonprofit. A third group might consist of people who are active volunteers at a shelter. Wherever it makes sense for your nonprofit to compartmentalize and start different appeals, do so! Now use this information to tailor each appeal to its specific demographic.

Another option is to make your next email or letter more inclusive. Perhaps you don’t have the resources to create appeals for 10 or 15 different groups at a time. But you can certainly make your appeal relevant to more people. We all can! For example, if your nonprofit provides shelter for animals, your letter needs to appeal to the different types of people you’re looking to convert into donors. For the passionate animal lover, you might want to include a heartwarming story of an animal that your shelter was able to save. For the person looking to adopt a pet, you might want to mention that you are housing animals that are in need of permanent homes.

Can you see why investing in donor identity is so important? If you don’t understand your donors and what motivates them to give, your appeal is going to be vague, dull, and ineffective. The result? You’re only going to have but a fraction of the impact that your nonprofit could have otherwise . . . Start learning about your donors and diversifying your appeal strategy today, and you’ll be well on your way to reaching and converting more prospects into donors.

The first step is finding out each donor’s identity and reason for giving. So how can we do that? Stay tuned for Grassroot Communications’ Donor Centric newsletter Here’s a clue: we can guess, or we can ask. We will discuss both in upcoming articles.

Intro to Donor Identity

In this series, our experts discuss the importance of donor identity and how to leverage it for your organization’s’ bottom line.

Motivation: It Matters.
Not everyone who shows up at a car dealership is looking for the same thing. It’s obvious, right? Every customer is unique and every customer is looking for something different from their shopping experience. In fact, even people who are looking at the exact same make and model have different motivations. A 20-year-old student might be looking to rent the shiny red convertible sports car because he wants a ride that will impress his dates. While a 50-year-old middle manager might be looking to purchase that same car to stave off a mid-life crisis. Thus, a good salesperson needs to know his client and understand her needs before embarking on the path to a sale.

Donor Identity

As it happens, the nonprofit’s business is a lot like the sales business. In order to be successful in finding and converting clients or constituents, you need to understand the range of motivation that drives each of them. For nonprofits, charities, and advocacy organizations, leaders must appeal to each donor’s motivation for giving. This unique motivation is what we mean when we talk about donor identity. It is the donor’s identity that nudges her to take out her pocketbook and write you a check. She sees herself as a certain type of person and donor and because of that, she gives to your org.
Here is an example: Joanne is a breast cancer survivor. It’s a big part of who she is, and because she beat cancer she feels compelled to make a large annual gift to a large cancer treatment center. Joanne was a patient there and she wants to help others like herself beat breast cancer.

Now, here’s another example for a different donor but the same charity. Paul is a cancer researcher at a major health organization. He studied immunology in college and wants to put that knowledge to good use in finding new treatments. Like Joanne, he makes an annual donation to the cancer treatment center. But unlike Joanne, Paul specifically gives because he is intrigued with the advanced therapies being tested on patients who have very aggressive forms for the disease. Thus, we have two donors who both give to the same organization, but for two very different reasons. Knowing what you know about Joanne and Paul what source of communication would you send each of them for a fundraising campaign?

For Joanne, perhaps a heartwarming story of a mother of three who overcame breast cancer (thanks in part to Joanne’s support) would be most effective. And for Paul, how about a rundown of the newest and latest treatment regiment being used for patients as well as their results. This personalization and relationship building is what donor identity is all about. But as you can see, the first step is finding out each donor’s identity and reason for giving.

So how can we do that? Stay tuned for Grassroot Communications’ Donor Centric newsletter Here’s a clue: we can guess, or we can ask. We will discuss both in upcoming articles.